thinkstare:

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thinkstare:

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vintagemanga:

HAYASHI Seiichi (林静一 ), Hakana yume /儚夢

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jcrew goth

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allthedaysordained:

The kaleidoscopic architecture of Iran photographed by Mohammed Reza Domiri Ganji

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my fave pic of me 

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thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong’s unprecedented protests & police crackdown, explained
September 29, 2014

Protest marches and vigils are fairly common in Hong Kong, but what began on Friday and escalated dramatically on Sunday is unprecedented. Mass acts of civil disobedience were met by a shocking and swift police response, which has led to clashes in the streets and popular outrage so great that analysts can only guess at what will happen next.

What’s going on in Hong Kong right now is a very big deal, and for reasons that go way beyond just this weekend’s protests. Hong Kong’s citizens are protesting to keep their promised democratic rights, which they worry — with good reason — could be taken away by the central Chinese government in Beijing. This moment is a sort of standoff between Hong Kong and China over the city’s future, a confrontation that they have been building toward for almost 20 years.

On Wednesday, student groups led peaceful marches to protest China’s new plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 election, which looked like China reneging on its promise to grant the autonomous region full democracy (see the next section for what that plan was such a big deal). Protest marches are pretty common in Hong Kong so it didn’t seem so unusual at first.

Things started escalating on Friday. Members of a protest group called Occupy Central (Central is the name of Hong Kong’s downtown district) had planned to launch a “civil disobedience” campaign on October 1, a national holiday celebrating communist China’s founding. But as the already-ongoing protesters escalated they decided to go for it now. On Friday, protesters peacefully occupied the forecourt (a courtyard-style open area in front of an office building) of Hong Kong’s city government headquarters along with other downtown areas.

The really important thing is what happened next: Hong Kong’s police cracked down with surprising force, fighting in the streets with protesters and eventually emerging with guns that, while likely filled with rubber bullets, look awfully militaristic. In response, outraged Hong Kong residents flooded into the streets to join the protesters, and on Sunday police blanketed Central with tear gas, which has been seen as a shocking and outrageous escalation. The Chinese central government issued a statement endorsing the police actions, as did Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing chief executive, a tacit signal that Beijing wishes for the protests to be cleared.

You have to remember that this is Hong Kong: an affluent and orderly place that prides itself on its civility and its freedom. Hong Kongers have a bit of a superiority complex when it comes to China, and see themselves as beyond the mainland’s authoritarianism and disorder. But there is also deep, deep anxiety that this could change, that Hong Kong could lose its special status, and this week’s events have hit on those anxieties to their core.

This began in 1997, when the United Kingdom handed over Hong Kong, one of its last imperial possessions, to the Chinese government. Hong Kong had spent over 150 years under British rule; it had become a fabulously wealthy center of commerce and had enjoyed, while not full democracy, far more freedom and democracy than the rest of China. So, as part of the handover, the Chinese government in Beijing promised to let Hong Kong keep its special rights and its autonomy — a deal known as “one country, two systems.”

A big part of that deal was China’s promise that, in 2017, Hong Kong’s citizens would be allowed to democratically elect their top leader for the first time ever. That leader, known as the Hong Kong chief executive, is currently appointed by a pro-Beijing committee. In 2007, the Chinese government reaffirmed its promise to give Hong Kong this right in 2017, which in Hong Kong is referred to as universal suffrage — a sign of how much value people assign to it.

But there have been disturbing signs throughout this year that the central Chinese government might renege on its promise. In July, the Chinese government issued a “white paper” stating that it has “comprehensive jurisdiction” over Hong Kong and that “the high degree of autonomy of [Hong Kong] is not an inherent power, but one that comes solely from the authorization by the central leadership.” It sounded to many like a warning from Beijing that it could dilute or outright revoke Hong Kong’s freedoms, and tens of thousands of Hong Kong’s citizens marched in protest.

Then, in August, Beijing announced its plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 elections. While citizens would be allowed to vote for the chief executive, the candidates for the election would have to be approved by a special committee just like the pro-Beijing committee that currently appoints the chief executive. This lets Beijing hand-pick candidates for the job, which is anti-democratic in itself, but also feels to many in Hong Kong like a first step toward eroding their promised democratic rights.

Full article
Photo 1, 2, 3

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morimotoshohei:

「屋上」 2014

morimotoshohei:

「屋上」 2014

bloombergphotos:

New Era of Civil Disobedience                              

Anti-government activists gather during a protest in Hong Kong, China, late Saturday and in the early morning hours of Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014. 

Pro-democracy protesters kick-started an occupation of central Hong Kong after students clashed with the city’s police, prompting thousands of people to take to the streets in support. 

China said last month that candidates for the 2017 leadership election must be vetted by a committee, angering pro-democracy campaigners who say the group is packed with business executives and lawmakers who favor Beijing. 

Read more from the report by Bloomberg News

Full coverage of the Hong Kong protest movement by the Bloomberg Photo team here.

Photographer: Lam Yik Fei/Bloomberg     

© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP

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two-browngirls:

ALHAMBRA CLOSEUP

lastuli:

1. A landscape of destruction is seen from the bathroom of a Palestinian apartment in Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip, August 18, 2014. Beit Hanoun was one of the hardest hit areas during Israel’s 50-day assault on Gaza. Photo credit: Thomas Coex

2. A Palestinian woman stands in the frame of a window that had been destroyed as Israel shelled her home in Gaza City’s Shuja’iyya neighborhood, August 11, 2014. An Egyptian-brokered ceasefire put the fighting on pause, but the ceasefire would soon collapse and Israeli air strikes on the Gaza Strip would continue for two more weeks. Photo credit: Hatem Moussa

3. A Palestinian man sits on a dust-covered couch in his damaged living room in Gaza City and inspects the damage to the buildings across from his apartment, July 12, 2014. Photo credit: Ezz Al-Zanoun

4. Palestinian women wearing comfortable prayer clothes take a break and look outside the window of their destroyed home following late night Israeli air strikes in Gaza City, August 20, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

5. Palestinian women look out from the window of their home to where the 15-story Basha Tower once stood, August 26, 2014. The tower was destroyed during an early morning Israeli air strike. With an open-ended ceasefire marking the end of Israel’s 50-day onslaught, Palestinians turned their attention to the streets to inspect the damage done to their neighborhoods. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

From Gaza’s Rectangular Views

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teenagesoil:

Steal His Look: Mulder Running Fast

Paul Smith Mainline Green Raglan Sleeve Cotton Sweatshirt in Forest Green ($275 )


T by Alexander Wang Light Sweatshirt ($255)

Stella McCartney Wool and silk-blend track pants ($700)

Air Jordan 6 SPORT BLUE Photos Ad Infinitum ($170)

The pain of losing a sister at the age of 12 and an incessant need to find out the truth about her abduction and the existence of extraterrestrial life (Free) 

teenagesoil:

Steal His Look: Mulder Running Fast

  • Paul Smith Mainline Green Raglan Sleeve Cotton Sweatshirt in Forest Green ($275 )

  • T by Alexander Wang Light Sweatshirt ($255)

  • Stella McCartney Wool and silk-blend track pants ($700)
  • Air Jordan 6 SPORT BLUE Photos Ad Infinitum ($170)

  • The pain of losing a sister at the age of 12 and an incessant need to find out the truth about her abduction and the existence of extraterrestrial life (Free) 

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brainfarto:


October means this kind of stuff.

brainfarto:

October means this kind of stuff.

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